Tuesday, July 2, 2013

Three Large-flowered Clematis by the Circle Lawn

Clematis 'Madam Julia Correvon' on one of the trellises around the Circle Lawn, with Clematis 'Fairy Dust' and Clematis 'Perle d' Azur' in the background.
Our garden has so many clematis this month, that I still have not gotten to post them all. Here are a few more for your viewing pleasure!


View along our Circle Lawn, Shade Path and fence gardens. Yellow perennial foxglove, Digitalis grandiflora, is still blooming, and now being echoed by the bright yellow flowers in front of variegated loosestrife, Lysimachia punctata 'Alexander'.
I do not think these three have bloomed as simultaneously other years. Often Clematis 'Madam Julia Correvon' begins a bit later in the season. The middle trellis is planted with Clematis 'Nelly Moser', which blooms in late spring.
Clematis 'Perle d' Azur' climbing the trunk of our old maple tree.  I did a post on this clematis last year, and am working on a new how-to post coming soon. :)
Thanks for reading along! For the summer months, I am hoping to share the views in our garden that are the most beautiful each week. I look forward to hearing what you like and answering any questions you might have about growing things in your own garden.

For those of you who knew about my test taking last week for the Royal Horticultural Society,  let me tell you that the test was not easy, but it went very well. I checked their student website, and it appears that I will not see my test results until September! So I will need some patience, but it will be worth it. 

My self-studying was a positive experience, and taking the test gave me a good reason to make sure I really knew everything I was reading. For instance, did you know that a tree transpires 98% of the water that it takes in, which can mean that a 48 foot tree (16 m) can lose as much as 58 gallons (220 l) an hour through its leaves!  Or that an average-sized tomato plant transpires about 30 gallons (115 l) during its growing season. (Tidbits from Botany for Gardeners by Brian Capon, which is on my garden book list. )

Have a great gardening week!
~Julie

16 comments:

  1. You have a lovely assortment of Clematis in your garden. I am sure you will have passed the exam. Do you know, I did a course in garden art history, designing, planting and knowledge of trees etc. , about the same as yours I think, it was fun and useful.

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    1. Thanks Janneke! I do hope so. The other half of this certification is garden history & design, and I am really looking forward to it.
      ~Julie

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  2. Wow you really did need to know the nitty gritty...I am sure you will have done fine but I hate waiting as well...Love the clematis and especially growing it up a tree....working on that in my garden as well.

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    1. Donna,
      Lots about plant cells, different adaptations and basic plant needs. It was fun :)
      I will enjoy seeing your clematis!
      ~Julie

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  3. It is usual in the UK to wait ages for exam results! I'm sure you did really well. Love the clematis, it's too hot and dry for them here in my garden.

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    1. Nice to know that, Christina. Very different here in the US where everything is done super-fast.... but then most of our standardized tests are multiple choice, which can be graded by computer and may not show as much understand as the essay style of the RHS tests. Hope you are staying cool in your summer dormant season!
      ~Julie

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  4. I love how the Perl D'Azur is climbing the trunk of the maple. Did you have to wrap something around the trunk?

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    1. Jason,
      There is a climbing hydrangea working its way up this tree as well, but it was only a baby when the clematis went in. I like to use sticks to get clematis started to their supports, and then we just tucked its growing stems into the deeply fissured bark as it grew. This spring there was a bit of stretching on our tip toes to reach it! I think the ladder may be necessary next year. :)
      ~Julie

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  5. so so beautiful! I love the climbing!:) I know you did awesome on that exam!:)

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  6. Love your clematis! Especially the one growing up a tree - I've been thinking of a plan to transplant some of mine from lonely corners to the base of a few trees so they can be seen better.

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    1. Thanks! I can see this blue one right out my bedroom window... very nice view! Hope your gets growing for you!
      ~Julie

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  7. all your flowers are sensational, keep posting, I love looking at green & colourful gardens!

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  8. Beautiful collection of clematis! I'm looking for more to add to my garden... those definitely look like possibilities.

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  9. Fascinating info about transpiration! We learned a bit about that in the master naturalist class. Your Clematis collection is impressive! It looks like a romantic garden right now!

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  10. Beautiful collection of colors :)

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