Thursday, March 28, 2013

Chanticleer's Bulb Lawn

Viburnum macrocephalum and Tulipa 'Akebona' in Chanticleer's Bulb Meadow.

When you emerge from Chanticleer's Asian Woods, you are greeted by sunshine and a wide swath of grass. But this is no ordinary field. In April and May, it is filled with a succession of colorful bulbs and flowering trees. This is the Bulb Lawn, where tulip, daffodils and bluebells abound.

This scene greets visitors as they leave Asian Woods. The fresh, new hosta leaves are at the edge of the woodland, and they blend the garden into the grass. The Silverbell or American Snowdrop tree (Halesia diptera) likes these woodland edges; it is blooming on the right.
The Chinese Snowball Bush, Viburnum macrocephalum, is a semi-evergreen shrub that is hardy in zones 6-9. As with most spring flowering shrubs and trees, pruning should be done right after flowering to avoid cutting off its new flower buds later in the year. More plant information here.
This beautiful yellow pairing is Tulipa 'Akebona' and Hosta 'Tokudama'. A nice stand of Asian tree peonies (Paeonia) show their buds and palmate foliage on the right.
Tulipa 'Akebona' is primarily yellow, but also has green flames and patches of red.  It is a truly romantic tulip. You can just see the Spanish bluebells coming up under these tulips.
Tulipa 'Akebona' and Hosta 'Tokudama' tumbling down the hill beside Asian Woods.
Looking to the left reveals another acre of colorful spring blooms, both on the ground and in the air.
Spanish bluebells (Hyacinthoides hispanica 'Excelsior') and bright yellow daffodils (Narcissus 'Hawera') in rough grass in the Bulb Lawn. Narcissus 'Hawera' is a beautiful little 'Triandrus' group daffodil, which has slender foliage and several flowers on each stem. I planted some Narcissus 'Hawera' in my own zone 5 garden and they have re-bloomed well in my sunny areas.
A glorious spring ensemble! The Himalayan Pine (Pinus wallichiana) adds some blue foliage to echo the bluebells.
Bluebells bloom at the bottom of this hill and also at the top in the distance as you follow the grassy path.

Read more of the Chanticleer Series on WMG

18 comments:

  1. O wow! This is gorgeous! To have a garden like this must be a dream. I do love spring flowers, especially the 'bulb' ones. Like treasures hidden underneath the surface and then popping out to show their faces once a year.
    Marian

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    1. Thanks for your comment, Marian! Spring is my favorite season, mostly because of bulbs I think :)
      ~Julie

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  2. I like the naturalness of the place... all your posts on Chanticleer have been a delight! Larry

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    1. Thanks Larry! So glad to share it with interested gardeners. I will post photos from around Chanticleer house next week for a finish to this series. And I am looking forward to visiting Chanticleer again this spring in May. :)
      ~Julie

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  3. You are a temptress Julie!! This garden is so wonderful, I'm going to have to persuade my husband that he really wants to visit it some day. I have really enjoyed all your posts about Chanticleer, such a wonderful garden, thank you for sharing it with us.

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    1. I do not think I have ever heard that one, Pauline! But in this case, I will acknowledge you are correct.
      Perhaps we can just switch countries for a few months! I cannot wait to someday see an "English" garden with my own eyes.
      Glad you enjoyed the series!
      ~Julie

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  4. The bulbs are fabulous. And that snowball bush is pretty fabulous, too! Great inspiration!

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    1. They are, aren't they! Another reason for me to wish for zone 6. :)
      ~Julie

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  5. Your blog really needs to carry some sort of warning along with it. Can I make a suggestion -
    'reading this blog could seriously damage your bank balance' - joking aside, fabulous pictures again, what a thoroughly enjoyable series you have shared with us.
    That Hosta/Tulip combination is gorgeous. One I wish I could replicate - Hostas are good in my garden but it's too moist for tulips. You've got me wondering now - pot grown tulips dotted amongst hostas, hmmmm!

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    1. This is "no holding back" gardening, Angie! Only pretty things here. I also LOVE that hosta/tulip combination. Pots in the hosta is a brilliant idea!
      Thanks for your complements!
      ~Julie

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  6. The daffodils and bluebells are such a perfect combination! Also, I love all the white tulips. It does give one ideas ...

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    1. The loose elegance of this garden is astounding. Truly romantic. So glad you have enjoyed the series!
      ~Julie

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  7. What a marvel!
    Any chance to plant tulips!
    With me, if I dare to plant tulips
    They will be immediately eaten by rats campaign ..

    Even the tulips planted in tall containers are eaten. Because they go in for the night.

    Thank you for these beautiful pictures

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    1. Thanks Francoise!
      UGH! Rats in your tulips sounds like a nightmare. Have you tried course gravel around your bulbs? or grit?
      Do they go after smaller bulbs?
      Glad you have enjoyed this series!
      ~Julie

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  8. Wonderful, amazing!! I love ...
    What a beautiful pictures!

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    1. Thanks Marie! I had a great time to visit last spring!
      ~Julie

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  9. I'm sighing over the tulips picking up the light edges of the hosta leaves - absolutely gorgeous. I need to tuck that idea away and use it in my yard eventually. Lovely shots. Thanks again for sharing!

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  10. I love the subtle colors of cream tulips and lots of green with a bit of yellow and purple...very relaxing.

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