Tuesday, March 26, 2013

Chanticleer's Asian Woods

Chanticleer's Asian bridge... corresponding to this multi-stemmed tree and the dark-stemmed Arisaema.
Chanticleer's Asian bridge... corresponding to this multi-stemmed tree and the dark-stemmed Arisaema.

Chanticleer's Asian Woods is beautiful in April! It is full of blooming woodland primroses, fresh hosta leaves, delicate peonies and many other woodland treasures. Orchids, Epimediums, Japanese maples and lady's slippers fill out the scene. Plant lovers, read on!

Bright pink Primula sieboldii cloth Asian Woods with their spring splendor.
The Woodland Peony, Paeonia japonica, is native to Japan. It likes moist, well drained soil and part shade. Hardy in zones 4 - 8. More plant information.
Chanticleer's Asian Woods in April. Clever bamboo rails keep feet from treading on these woodland treasures.
This Calanthe Hizen Hybrid is a hardy orchid that blooms in the Asian Woods. They are considered hardy to zone 7, or possibly zone 6. Read more here.
This beautiful hybrid of our native sweet shrub, x Sinocalycalycanthus raulstonii 'Hartlage Wine', was in full bloom at the end of April in Asian Woods.
The Asian lady's slipper orchid, Cypripedium japonicum, is native to east Asia. It seems to be quite hardy, maybe even to zone 4. More plant information here.
Light pink Primula sieboldii, golden miniature Hosta and blue-flowering Brunnera filled these beds to the brim.
Primula sieboldii is the primrose for dry shade gardens. It is native to east Asia. This form has ruffled flowers in addition to the typical ruffled leaves.
Chinese mayapple (Podophyllum pleianthum) can be found in several garden beds in the Asian Woods. It is native to central/southeastern China, has dark red flowers and is hardy in zones 6-8. More details here.
Fairybells (Disporum flavens) like full to part shade. Native to Korea, they rhizomes creep along the forest floor and produce black berries after their yellow, April flowers. More information here.
I really loved this variegated climbing hydrangea, Hydrangea anomala ssp. petiolaris 'Firefly', that has medium green leaves with yellow margins. While researching this beautiful vine, I found that it originated at Chanticleer. Perhaps this one pictured was the original!
It is worthwhile to take your time walking through Chanticleer's Asian Woods. You never know what you will come upon next! For their complete plant list for this garden, see Chanticleer's Plant Lists: Asian Woods.

Read more of the Chanticleer Series on WMG

18 comments:

  1. What a way to brighten the morning! I'm going to miss this series when it ends. And you just reminded me that I need to move my Disporum flavens and add Hydrangea petiolaris 'Firefly' to the wish list.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Sue! I am going to try to write three more posts... we will see if I make it :) I hope that spring has sprung in my own garden by then! The hydrangea is on my list as well.
      ~Julie

      Delete
  2. Replies
    1. Thanks Larry! Glad you have enjoyed this series. You must come out for a visit sometime!
      ~Julie

      Delete
  3. I just knew I was going to be drooling as I was reading! Amazing. I've now added a few more plants to my wish list. I had never heard of the Podophyllum before, even better my local nursery stocks it!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. There were quite a few new plants in this garden for me. And if you take a look at the plant list, you could spend an entire afternoon "googling" to see new asian flowers. Just stunning.
      How to nice to know that you can bring a few home as well!
      ~Julie

      Delete
  4. Absolutely wonderful, now I know what to plant in some bare patches in my own woodland, many thanks!!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Your woodland is stunning already! But I am so glad you found some new plants to keep it exciting for you. I cannot wait to see your Himalayan poppies again this year, Pauline!
      ~Julie

      Delete
  5. Oh, I'm in love with that woodland peony! I have to find out if it is hardy in my zone.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The site that I link to for that plant is from the Missouri Botanical Garden, They say that Paeonia japonica is hardy from zones 5-8... one that I can actually plant! Very exciting news for me, and I believe for you in Chicago as well.
      ~Julie

      Delete
  6. What a beautiful April garden, so colourful. I like all the specialties, but most of all I love the variety of Primulas.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I confess a weakness for these primula as well! Primula sieboldii were one of two plants that I bought for my own garden after all that I saw at Chanticleer. The other was the snowdrop anemone, A. sylvestris. I am crossing my fingers that they both come again this spring :)
      ~Julie

      Delete
  7. I love the sweet shrub - just gorgeous, and the woodland peony, and the primula , and the climbing hydrangea. I would happily take every plant featured here! Beautiful Julie, and it is so nice to see colour, we are still a sea of brown and snow patches up here.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Very colorful! I'd never seen the Chinese Mayapple before--such a deep color of red and so different from our native Podophyllums. Thanks for taking us along on the tour.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Oh my goodness is this garden gorgeous! I mean the colors and the textures are exquisite! I love the borders!! Thank you for sharing!!!

    ReplyDelete
  10. Wonderfull !! tank you for the pictures !

    ReplyDelete
  11. I really like the way they crafted these paths and fencing with the unusual blooms spilling out on the paths.

    ReplyDelete
  12. The primroses are beautiful!

    Purrs,
    Nissy

    ReplyDelete

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...