Tuesday, February 26, 2013

Visit to Chanticleer Gardens in Wayne, PA: The Entrance

Bold container plantings at the entrance to Chanticleer Gardens.
Bold container plantings at the entrance to Chanticleer Gardens.
Last spring I had the pleasure of visiting one of the most beautiful gardens in North America with some wonderful blogging friendsChanticleer, in Wayne, PA, is an excellent example of a public garden that still revels in being made by real gardeners.
Chanticleer Gardens reminds me of reading from Rosemary Verey that "detail is all important."  Chanticleer's attention to planting details is so well done.  Color harmonies and complements are everywhere for the taking, with many layers of planting supporting each theme whether pastel or bold. I would not say it is a perfectionists garden; there certainly were bare (or even unsightly) spots here and there. But it is an altogether charming place to visit, perhaps because it is not so uptight. Romantic is a word that describes it well.

As I sit down to work on this post from my visit, I still feel over-awed at the orchestration in planting that I saw at Chanticleer, now nearly eleven months ago. I decided that the best way through this garden visit would be a bite at a time. So, here we begin at the entrance.
Just steps from the parking lot, we were greeted by this beautiful yellow rose. Just behind, you might be able to see the large, yellow tulips that match her perfectly.
Just steps from the parking lot, we were greeted by this beautiful yellow rose, Rosa hugonis. Just behind, you might be able to see the large, yellow tulips that match her perfectly.
Chanticleer's entrance pavilion for the summer months.
Chanticleer's entrance pavilion for the summer months.
Pots of sage, daffodils, wall flowers and pinks on the front steps of the entrance house.
Pots of purple-flowered Erysimum linifolium ‘Variegatum’, white and yellow daffodils and magenta stock (Mattiola incana) on the front steps of the entrance house.
You enter the garden proper from the courtyard of the smaller house on the estate. The Rosengartens built it for their daughter, Emily, in 1935.on the estate. The Rosengartens built it for their daughter, Emily, in 1935.
You enter the garden proper from the courtyard of the smaller house on the estate. The Rosengartens built it for their daughter, Emily, in 1935.
Osteospermum 'Whirligig' (purple form) was in many of the containers, along with variegated thyme and dark-leaved lettuce.
Osteospermum 'Whirligig' (purple form) was in many of the containers, along with variegated thyme and dark-leaved lettuce.

The yellow annuals in these pots seems to draw out the colors of the golden locust tree across the way.
The yellow annuals in these pots seems to draw out the colors of the golden locust tree across the way.
This golden maple makes a beautiful potted tree in this tall terra cotta.
This golden maple (Acer campestre 'Postulense') makes a beautiful potted tree in this tall terra cotta with Salvia officinalis ‘Aurea’.
Strawberries and colorful greens in a window box... a combination to be monitored!
Strawberries and colorful greens in a window box... a combination to be monitored!
A few more beautiful terra cotta inside the courtyard of the entrance house. Curly parsley was an oft used plant in many of their containers.
A few more beautiful terra cotta inside the courtyard of the entrance house. Curly parsley was an oft used plant in many of their containers.

See more of the Chanticleer Series on WMG!

11 comments:

  1. I have to agree that Chanticleer is one of the most beuatiful public gardens in the northeast. Lots of talented plant people work magic in the gardens all season long. By the look of your pictures, spring is a glorious time to visit. I'm looking forward to future installments.

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    1. Spring was amazing - especially last year as it came all at once, with roses blooming with the late tulips. Definitely a great time to visit Chanticleer. We are hoping to go again this year and combine it with visiting Longwood and Wintherthur as well!
      ~Julie

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  2. I have read so much about this wonderful garden, if ever we get over the " other side " we will have to make sure we visit. What a wonderful display of colour for us to enjoy at this dull,grey time of year, they certainly have a way with their combinations of plants.

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    1. As I walked about, Pauline, the word "romantic" kept springing to mind. It is exuberant in a way that I have not seen in another US garden. Worth a visit! There are several in that area, actually.
      ~Julie

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  3. This garden is on my must see list. Thanks for the tour!

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  4. I haven't been to Chanticleer, it looks like a gardening dream!

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  5. Chanticleer is definitely on my "must-visit" list of gardens(hopefully this growing season). Your photographs are very beautiful. I love that maple tree in the terracotta pot. It is stunning! The plantings you show in your post are beautiful. I can't wait to see more. Thank you for sharing your photos with us Julie!
    Susan

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  6. Looking forward to your future posts... I have wanted to visit this garden for years and hopefully will eventually do so... beautiful! Larry

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  7. Julie what a gorgeous spot and I love, love , love those containers

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  8. What wonderful container plantings! I had to look through the images a couple of times to make mental notes.

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  9. I need to go there! Thanks for sharing your beautiful photos in this post and your second Chanticleer. I've seen it mentioned in magazines but there are never enough photos. I love it that you're doing installments.

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