Tuesday, January 22, 2013

Coffee Filter Flower Wreath Tutorial (aka: Must Have More Flowers!)

Paper flowers made from brown coffee filters.
Paper flowers made from brown coffee filters.
Need some more flowers in your life at the moment? In addition to growing paper whites, cyclamen, African violets and amaryllis in the house at this time of year, flower crafts can also bring some spring to warm our lives in the cold. This particular craft was therapy for my flower-deprived soul a few weeks ago, so I decided to try sharing with you too.... just in case you are also feeling the winter blues.


There are so many ways to include floral motifs into your decor, everything from the simplest daisy to the ruffled rose. Here is a flower wreath that I built starting from a tutorial on Jones Designs, and then added my own twist to the flowers to give them more botanical imagination.
Paper flowers on one side of a large wreath. I like to think of these flowers as representing the differing flower forms in the Peony family... single, semi-double, fully double, Japanese, Anemone and "bomb" shaped.
Paper flowers on one side of a large wreath. I like to think of these flowers as representing the differing flower forms in the Peony family... single, semi-double, fully double, Japanese, Anemone and "bomb" shaped.
The larger wreath I made is hanging in our hallway.
The larger wreath I made is hanging in our hallway.

How to make a Coffee Filter Flower Wreath:
How to make a Coffee Filter Flower Wreath:

Materials:
  1. Brown or natural colored coffee filters - I used the smaller size
  2. Brown masking (painters) tape
  3. Scissors
  4. Hot glue gun
  5. Grapevine wreath - size of your choice
  6. Acrylic or watercolor paint for the green leaves (optional)
  7. Paint brush (optional)
  8. Ribbon or floral wire for hanging finished wreath
I really liked the basic technique for rolling coffee filter flowers with masking tape, but I wanted a little more variation in petal forms.  The secret is in the cutting of the coffee filters at the beginning. Adding more curves to the shape of your petals, as opposed to a slight wave, allows them to open up and create a larger flower overall.
Fold your coffee filter in half, and then in half again. For large petals, cut large arches. For smaller petals, cut more arches closer together. Cut out the center of the filter, which will create a small circle you may also use for your petals. After you have practice cutting a few filters, you may be able to cut three or four at once by folding them all together.
Fold your coffee filter in half, and then in half again. For large petals, cut large arches. For smaller petals, cut more arches closer together. Cut out the center of the filter, which will create a small circle you may also use for your petals. After you have practice cutting a few filters, you may be able to cut three or four at once by folding them all together.
Here is a sample of the filter piece I used for one flower: two small circles, a set of smaller petals, and a set of larger petals. Unfold each piece to prepare to make your flowers. The sets of petals will sit be in a circle; rip one part of the circle so that you can string them out on the masking tape.
Here is a sample of the filter piece I used for one flower: two small circles, a set of smaller petals, and a set of larger petals. Unfold each piece to prepare to make your flowers. The sets of petals will sit be in a circle; rip one part of the circle so that you can string them out on the masking tape.
Anchoring the masking tape to your table on one side, begin ruffling your filter paper pieces along, beginning with the shortest ones and continuing through the tallest ones. I found it easiest to not rip the tape off of the roll until I was done sticking the filters to it.
Anchoring the masking tape to your table on one side, begin ruffling your filter paper pieces along, beginning with the shortest ones and continuing through the tallest ones. I found it easiest to not rip the tape off of the roll until I was done sticking the filters to it.
Next, begin to roll up the masking tape from the anchored end. Pay attention to how your filters are gathering. You can really play with the look of your flowers as you roll up the tape... add more gathers to add volume and less to tighten the flower form.  You can also add more large petals at the end if you find that your flower is in need of one more row.
Next, begin to roll up the masking tape from the anchored end. Pay attention to how your filters are gathering. You can really play with the look of your flowers as you roll up the tape... add more gathers to add volume and less to tighten the flower form.  You can also add more large petals at the end if you find that your flower is in need of one more row.
Finish your flower and secure the end of the masking tape.
Finish your flower and secure the end of the masking tape.
One finished coffee filter flower.
One finished coffee filter flower.
Hot glue your flower to your wreath, looking to vary the flower forms for more interest.
Hot glue your flower to your wreath, looking to vary the flower forms for more interest.
If you want to add a touch of spring to your brown wreath, use a bit of green paint on one of your coffee filters and let it dry. Cut out a leaf and glue it to your wreath, attaching it under your flowers.

Other options are to paint or dye all of your coffee filters to give them some color. I noticed, though, that I liked how my unpainted flower retained the corrugated edges of a bought filter. It gives the flowers a little more character and fluff.
Small flower wreath on a door with spring green leaves added.
Small flower wreath on a door with spring green leaves added.
Large coffee filter wreath in the hallway.
Large coffee filter wreath in the hallway.
I hope you enjoyed my attempt at a craft tutorial!

I have collected a few other pretty floral craft ideas you might like into my Sewing/Crafting Pinterest boardMy Pinterest boards are primarily, however, packed with plenty of garden photos... are you surprised? :)

13 comments:

  1. That is so beautiful! What I like about it is the texture and color of the flowers! Thank you for sharing...I am so going to be trying this one!

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    Replies
    1. Glad you like it! It is a pretty lift for the winter months... and easy to change for different seasons.
      ~Julie

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  2. What a great idea and so clever...I can see why your garden is so creative and beautiful!

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  3. What a wonderful idea, they look so pretty too! I will be telling my daughter, it's the sort of thing that she likes to do!

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  4. I LOVE your tutorial Julie! You did an amazing job with your photos and explaining each step... very easy to follow and has me wanting to make one!:) Thanks so much for sharing! And I love that you can make simple changes for different seasons!!!!:)

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  5. Thank you so much for the craft ideas. I look forward to your blog everyday. You sure know how to brighten up ones winter blue days. It's very cold here in Eau Claire, WI. -10 and wind of -30. So a good day to stay inside if one can. Thanks again. Sheila Stephens

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  6. Great idea. I think you did great with your tutorial and I like the results. I think this should help us get over the hump until spring. Of course the flower photos below don't hurt either. :)

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  7. Very nice! I enjoy craft ideas that allow us to use and repurpose items we already have. Thanks for the idea!

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  8. What an ingenious idea. I never thought to use coffee filters for anything except my 8 o'clock coffee. I am quite smitten with that small wreath. I am going to give this tutorial a try. Thanks for the great idea and inspiration!

    Susan

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  9. Wouah ! It looks like my malva Parkallee Summer crown : http://a-little-bit-of-paradise.over-blog.com/article-couronne-de-malvas-82325792.html

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