Tuesday, October 9, 2012

The Shade Path Garden in Early October

The Shade Path Garden in the first week of October.
October is here and has brought some chilly temperatures in Pennsylvania. It seemed to come on us all at once this year. It was quite warm and rainy, but not truly cold until this week which makes it feel a bit shocking, though we all knew it was coming. We have missed a true frost twice in the last couple evenings. Some tender leaves are browned around their edges, but most of the plants are still standing tall. Very soon the annuals will greet the morning as a puddle of mush and will need to be removed post-haste.


The above view of the Shade Path is a long view from the front sidewalk at our corner property. The Front Walk with its dahlias is to the left, the Circle Lawn is in the middle and the Shade Path connects these gardens to the backyard gate. Read more on succession planting in the Shade Path for more information on plant varieties and planting schemes in this garden.
View from the Shade Path to the Circle Lawn. The Curb Strip planting is just seen in the upper left corner.
I look forward to the flowers and foliage of fall, even though I will admit to being sad to let go of summer for another year. But, winter must come and I am pleased for it to come, as long as spring is also on its way.

My yellow perennial foxgloves, Digitalis grandiflora, are just starting to rebloom this autumn.
Finally some of the Digitalis grandiflora are flowering again. I gave them up for rebloom this year after our hot and dry summer stressed them a bit. Last year they were stunning in September. Perhaps they will be again another year. My only trick to induce rebloom is to cut off the spent blooms in June to just above the first leaf set on the stalk. This will work for all Digitalis, though some rebloom more profusely than others.

Oakleaf hydrangea (Hydrangea quercifolia) just turning colors while surrounded by the white puffs of native flat-topped aster, Doellingeria umbellata. This aster is like baby's breath (Gypsophila) for the autumn garden.
When an aster seedling of Doellingeria umbellata appeared in the Shade Path three years ago, I waited to see what it would do in the fall. When I loved its wispy texture, I took the seeds of that little aster and dusted it around and about the Shade Path and the Driveway Garden to enjoy it to the full in October. It turns out that it had blown in from the railroad grade just a couple of blocks away. It makes an even better garden plant by cutting it back with shears by half its height in mid-June.

So, if you are interested in this plant and in eastern US, check in the nearest railroad grade or abandoned plot down the street. You just might find a gem instead of an enemy!

Flowers surrounding the Circle Lawn as still going strong: red Begonia 'Dragon Wings', white Euphorbia 'Diamond Frost', blue Buddleia, pink Sedum 'Autumn Joy' and a white Mandevilla.
View to Cherry Corner and the street. Clematis 'Perle d' Azur' climbs the maple tree with some help.
Sidewalk view of the Shade Path. The white aster Doellingeria umbellata and other white foliage plants give the shade garden interest in the fall.
Sedum 'Frosty Morn'  in the shade garden.
Sedum 'Frosty Morn' has done well even in these part sun areas. It looks wonderful with the white aster and corresponds to the other white edge foliage, like Solomon's seal (Polygonatum odoratum 'Variegatum') which can be seen behind it in the above photo.

Northern Sea Oats (Chasmanthium latifolium) in October.
Thanks for letting me share some view our garden in October with you! It has been a busy season around here and I think that I have been having a bit of blog burnout, but I wanted to post some of the pretty photos that I still enjoy taking.  Stay warm!

19 comments:

  1. 9 okt.; first, my husband have birthsday!! but,.... your autumm-garden are beautifull!!!! groet. Diny

    ReplyDelete
  2. Julie, your garden blooms like in summer! I love the 'bonsai' tree in a pot on 6th photo.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It is still green, though it is edging more yellow this week with the colder weather. Thank you for your nice comments, Nadezda!
      ~Julie

      Delete
  3. Beautiful, I like the light falling through the leaves of the tree on the lawn.
    Regards, Janneke

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you, Janneke! It is a beautiful time of year.
      ~Julie

      Delete
  4. The garden is looking fabulous, and the little aster and the sedum are lovely.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Marisa. I do think I am enjoy the wild asters more this year than my other varieties... and they are always covered in pollinators of every sort!
      ~Julie

      Delete
  5. I agree that the aster is a gem! Looks good everywhere.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Asters are so wonderful for autumn, for us to enjoy ans well as he insects.

    ReplyDelete
  7. How nice that your foxgloves are reblooming! I have the same species, but have never seen them rebloom in fall.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Gosh, I wish I was in your garden right now. Mind is dying and a mess with all the fallen Oak leaves! Your Oakleaf Hydrangea is incredible. And I must plant Sea Oats--I keep seeing them on blogs and they are so fascinating!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The sea oats was a gift from a neighbor and I have been surprised how much I have enjoyed it! It is just fun to watch in all seasons.
      ~Julie

      Delete
  9. Your garden is very inspirational. I would love to have still so much colour in my garden in October! When it is time to choose plants I will definitely come back here and see what to get.

    ReplyDelete
  10. The changing seasons are very special and your garden is looking lovely after the heat of hte summer; I've missed your posts but I know what you mean about blog burnout! It does take time to write and then read others'posts; I always really enjoy yours, Christina

    ReplyDelete
  11. Julie as always your garden is fabulous with blooms...mine is fading with the cold weather but no frosts yet here either...but we are scheduled fr a freeze this weekend.

    ReplyDelete
  12. I am loving the red Begonias! I will be reading more about your succession plantings to gather some ideas because most of my garden is shade. Lovely garden Julie!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Glad to help! Shade gardening can be really fun. They are some of the most peaceful gardens around.
      ~Julie

      Delete

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...