Saturday, September 15, 2012

Gardening in Pennsylvania ~ GBBD Sept 2012

Pink Dahlia with Euphorbia 'Diamond Frost' in our Front Walk Garden.
Pink Dahlia with Euphorbia 'Diamond Frost' in our Front Walk Garden.
Welcome to Pennsylvania in September! My garden has definitely perked up for fall. We finally had a normal amount of rain for the month, which is the first month since last year. The plants are putting on new growth, looking greener and flowering a bit more. Here are some highlights from around our two-tenths of an acre at Gilmore Gardens.


Our Front Walk is all in pink and white this year, which I like as a change from the fiery reds of last year. I bought a mix of pink Dahlias and started them in pots in April. They were planted out into this garden after the big bloom of poppies, allium and catmint died down in July.
Our Front Walk is all in pink and white this year, which I like as a change from the fiery reds of last year. I bought a mix of pink Dahlias and started them in pots in April. They were planted out into this garden after the big bloom of poppies, allium and catmint died down in July.
The beauty of pink Japanese Anemones in the setting sun this September. This is one of the flowers that I can't wait to see each fall! And they improve in size and bloom every year.
The beauty of pink Japanese Anemones in the setting sun this September. This is one of the flowers that I can't wait to see each fall! And they improve in size and bloom every year.
Here is a view so that you can see just how close we are to the corner! There is a four-way stop just beside our garden. The annual Euphorbia 'Diamond Frost' has added a white carpet backdrop underneath the taller flowers. The elephant ears, Colocasias, were also planted in July. They add some bold foliage to this otherwise finely-textured planting.
Here is a view so that you can see just how close we are to the corner! There is a four-way stop just beside our garden. The annual Euphorbia 'Diamond Frost' has added a white carpet backdrop underneath the taller flowers. The elephant ears, Colocasias, were also planted in July. They add some bold foliage to this otherwise finely-textured planting.
A few remaining stalks of variegated loosestrife, Lysimachia punctata 'Alexander', fill out the middle height. Its foliage is always a welcome accent in this area.
A few remaining stalks of variegated loosestrife, Lysimachia punctata 'Alexander', fill out the middle height. Its foliage is always a welcome accent in this area.
White-flowering Liriope 'Alba' is just starting in the Front Woodland, which is the large curb strip planting at the very front our property. I also have the purple-flowering and the variegated form of Liriope in this garden, but I always look forward to seeing the white flowers in September. Liriope is happy with the dry, part sun conditions in this area under two mature maple trees.
White-flowering Liriope 'Alba' is just starting in the Front Woodland, which is the large curb strip planting at the very front our property. I also have the purple-flowering and the variegated form of Liriope in this garden, but I always look forward to seeing the white flowers in September. Liriope is happy with the dry, part sun conditions in this area under two mature maple trees.
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In the Shade Path Garden for fall, the red Begonia 'Dragon Wings' is still going strong, along annual Euphorbia 'Diamond Frost' and a few New Guinea Impatiens.
In the Shade Path Garden for fall, the red Begonia 'Dragon Wings' is still going strong, along annual Euphorbia 'Diamond Frost' and a few New Guinea Impatiens. 
One of the first plants at the edge of this garden is Sedum 'Frosty Morn'. It gets a lot of sun early in the day, and is still in bud since it was pruned down by half at the beginning of June. This herbaceous pruning helps to keep it from flopping later on, as most taller sedums are prone to do. It also helps delay the blooms til later in the fall season, which keeps the garden interesting a couple of weeks longer. Frosty Morn makes a great combination here with the red Begonia 'Dragon Wings', Euphorbia 'Diamond Frost' and Japanese forest grass (Hakonechloa macra 'Aureola').
One of the first plants at the edge of this garden is Sedum 'Frosty Morn'. It gets a lot of sun early in the day, and is still in bud since it was pruned down by half at the beginning of June. This herbaceous pruning helps to keep it from flopping later on, as most taller sedums are prone to do. It also helps delay the blooms til later in the fall season, which keeps the garden interesting a couple of weeks longer. Frosty Morn makes a great combination here with the red Begonia 'Dragon Wings', Euphorbia 'Diamond Frost' and Japanese forest grass (Hakonechloa macra 'Aureola').
The white froth of native aster (Doellingeria unbellata) is just starting down the length of the Shade Path. Last fall, I planted more Sedum 'Frosty Morn' to add some white variegation to this very dry, very shady garden. They look wonderful with the asters...
The white froth of native aster (Doellingeria unbellata) is just starting down the length of the Shade Path. Last fall, I planted more Sedum 'Frosty Morn' to add some white variegation to this very dry, very shady garden. They look wonderful with the asters...
... and with the variegated Solomon's seal (Polygonatum odoratum 'Variegatum') that I brought back from visiting Carolyn's garden in April.
... and with the variegated Solomon's seal (Polygonatum odoratum 'Variegatum') that I brought back from visiting Carolyn's garden in April.
Sedum 'Autumn Joy' is just blushing around the Circle Lawn.
Sedum 'Autumn Joy' is just blushing around the Circle Lawn.
The tropical Mandeville vine is just a great addition to follow up Clematis 'Nelly Moser', that bloomed in May. I only regret that I planted the Mandeville in August this year instead of in June. Its pink blooms are echoing the Sedum 'Autumn Joy' behind it.
The tropical Mandeville vine is just a great addition to follow up Clematis 'Nelly Moser', that bloomed in May. I only regret that I planted the Mandeville in August this year instead of in June. Its pink blooms are echoing the Sedum 'Autumn Joy' behind it.
One more nice combination around the Circle Lawn: a blue butterfly bush (Buddleia), Sedum 'Frosty Morn' (again) and the floating seed-heads of Northern sea oats (Chasmanthium latifolium). The latter is also known as Woodoats, Inland sea oats or River oats.
One more nice combination around the Circle Lawn: a blue butterfly bush (Buddleia), Sedum 'Frosty Morn' (again) and the floating seed-heads of Northern sea oats (Chasmanthium latifolium). The latter is also known as Woodoats, Inland sea oats or River oats.
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In the Driveway Garden, the dwarf Miscanthus 'Dixieland' is still making a splash with purple Geranium 'Rozanne' and orange California poppies (Eschscholzia californica).
In the Driveway Garden, the dwarf Miscanthus 'Dixieland' is still making a splash with purple Geranium 'Rozanne' and orange California poppies (Eschscholzia californica).
Orange California poppies, Eschscholzia californica, are an easy annual to grow from seed. Once you plant them, you may see a few that re-seed from past years too. Miscanthus sinensis 'Dixieland' is so valuable for its white variegated leaves. Its smaller size, 3 feet tall by 3 feet wide, makes it easy to fit into my smaller garden.
Orange California poppies, Eschscholzia californica, are an easy annual to grow from seed. Once you plant them, you may see a few that re-seed from past years too. Miscanthus sinensis 'Dixieland' is so valuable for its white variegated leaves. Its smaller size, 3 feet tall by 3 feet wide, makes it easy to fit into my smaller garden.
Large-flowered hardy hibiscus (Hibiscus moscheutos 'Pink Elephant') was definitely the star of the summer, and is still blooming. Nearly every driver who stopped in the driveway exclaimed, "What is that?!?"
Large-flowered hardy hibiscus (Hibiscus moscheutos 'Pink Elephant') was definitely the star of the summer, and is still blooming. Nearly every driver who stopped in the driveway exclaimed, "What is that?!?"
Coreopsis 'Moonbeam' putting on a second flush after its "hair cut" in early August. It is an incredible easy care, sun-loving perennial.
Coreopsis 'Moonbeam' putting on a second flush after its "hair cut" in early August. It is an incredible easy care, sun-loving perennial.
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The Hill Garden is last, but it really is the first garden that visitors see as they pull up to our old house. It has been full of flowers since March this year.
The Hill Garden is last, but it really is the first garden that visitors see as they pull up to our old house. It has been full of flowers since March this year.
Silvery lamb's ears (Stachys byzantine) are holding their ground, though they were beaten back severely in July. Once their blooms are spent, I cut them down. Then the plant renews its foliage, giving it a fresher look for the rest of the year.
Silvery lamb's ears (Stachys byzantine) are holding their ground, though they were beaten back severely in July. Once their blooms are spent, I cut them down. Then the plant renews its foliage, giving it a fresher look for the rest of the year.
White Allium tuberosum is another one of my fall favorites. I have seeded it throughout the Hill Garden to give it a lift in color at this time.... and the pollinators love it!
White Allium tuberosum is another one of my fall favorites. I have seeded it throughout the Hill Garden to give it a lift in color at this time.... and the pollinators love it!
White, silver and purple... a nice color combination with Allium tuberosum.
White, silver and purple... a nice color combination with Allium tuberosum.
I like how the domes of Allium echo the shape of the Sedum 'Autumn Joy', which is also in the Hill Garden. Rosa 'The Fairy' is re-blooming for the fall on the far left. The purple coneflower (Echinacea purpurea) is finishing off on the top of the Hill, but is still valuable for its seed heads.
I like how the domes of Allium echo the shape of the Sedum 'Autumn Joy', which is also in the Hill Garden. Rosa 'The Fairy' is re-blooming for the fall on the far left. The purple coneflower (Echinacea purpurea) is finishing off on the top of the Hill, but is still valuable for its seed heads.
Along the back fence is one more gem, purple meadow rue (Thalictrum delavayi 'Splendide'), blooming along with Hydrangea 'Limelight'.
Along the back fence is one more gem, purple meadow rue (Thalictrum delavayi 'Splendide'), blooming along with Hydrangea 'Limelight'.
I am linking up to the flower party at Carol's May Dreams for Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day for September.

Happy Fall to everyone in the North!
(And Spring to everyone in the South!)

29 comments:

  1. Loved the walk-about in your pretty garden, my first visit here. I also grow Sedum 'Frosty Morn' and mine have just gone into flower here in my London garden. Good to hear you finally got some rain over there, we have finally had some sunny days here - after a very wet summer.

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    1. Thanks for your visit and comment! We and our garden are enjoying the belated rain, though the monsoon we had at my daughters soccer game last week was a bit much :) Looking forward to reading your blog.
      ~Julie

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  2. Your garden is looking so fabulous right now. I just loved wandering around seeing all the colour, and the fabulous planting combinations. Obviously your garden weathered the dry conditions very well, but it must be appreciating the rain finally.

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    1. Thanks Bernie! I am looking forward to seeing spring in your garden.
      ~Julie

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  3. Your garden is always an inspiration to me - beautiful! The shade path garden is my favourite. Happy GBBD :)

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    1. Thanks Christine! I am enjoying it more now that I am not feeling so guilty about it needing more water than I was giving it. :) But even before, I think the design hold things together even when the planting was flopped.
      ~Julie

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  4. So many beautiful flowers!
    Happy GBBD!
    Lea
    Lea's Menagerie

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  5. your garden is looking summery rather than autumnal. I am so interested that you can plant out in July or even early august, thatwoul dbe the kiss of death to plants here in the Mediterranean. I to have and love Sedum 'Frosty Morn'. I would so like to have Miscanthus dixieland, such a lift of colour in your borders. Christina

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    1. Summer is pretty green here, at least for the moment. Soon the leaves will be turning and the garden will get a whole different look to it. I highly recommend M. 'Dixieland'! I love it.
      ~Julie

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  6. Your garden is stunning! I love how your beds follow along the walk! You have convinced me to plant Japanese Anemones....they are just lovely. Inspiring space!!

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    1. I am glad that I included the Japanese Anemone photo then! They are beautiful... the white variety also. Thanks for your commments!
      ~Julie

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  7. Such a lovely wander round your garden, it is beautiful. Must try Sedum Frosty Morn, it looks stunning! Your pollinators must be very happy, you have so many plants for them.

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    1. Sedum 'Frosty Morn' is beautiful. It turns color slightly later than S. 'Autumn Joy'. There certainly are lots of bees around here :)
      ~Julie

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  8. Your garden is looking amazing this fall. I particularly like those Japanese anemones. I've planted a few and hope (with patience) they will grow larger someday. The thalictrum is so delicate as well!

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    1. Definitely worth waiting for! They are beautiful
      ~Julie

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  9. Julie again such a lovely look at your blooms...I too love the garlic chives and plant to move more seedlings around. I love the dramatic yet col effect of Frosty Morn with the red begonia.

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  10. Thank you for sharing the walk in your garden. You still have lots of flowering plants. I like the white Liriope in your front woodland very much.

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  11. I like those California poppies. I thought they bloomed in spring. Do you grow them as annuals

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    1. Jason,
      They grow in the summer for us in zone 5... and when I remember to cut them back they keep blooming all summer. They do re-seed here and there too, which I love.
      ~Julie

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  12. Your garden is just lovely! Thank goodness for Japanese anemones--our poor SC garden is looking very tired right now, with the exception of a large bed of these lovely blooms. They truly are one of my favorite flowers, particularly since they tolerate our shady garden. I'm terribly envious of your poppies--I can't grow them in our garden, as I've tried several times. I think they need more of a chilling period than our zone allows, sadly. I thoroughly enjoyed touring your garden--my first visit, but I look forward to returning often. Happy Bloom Day to you!

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  13. So much to see in your garden this visit. Your lovely dahlia has reminded me to add mail-ordering a few for my garden to my to-do list. A very happy GBBD.

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  14. Hello, Julie. I swear you have so much more in your small space than I have in my bigger one. I like the way you add tropicals to the mix. But that dahlia is amazing -- do you lift it, store it over the winter, and replant in the spring? I haven't tried that yet. Happy autumn! P. x

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  15. Hello,
    Thank you for the pleasure offered to admire all these beautiful plants.
    Large sedum, I cut the branches in June before, and let those behind pushing, as I have blooms spread.
    Euphorbia diamond frost, I planted myself this year! I love them .. Have you ever tried to make cuttings?
    the bear ears, I often oter old leaves deviennet less pretty, but it is a pleasure to handle this down so sweet.
    I hope one day happen to have bands of flowers as harmonious as yours!

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  16. You have many of the same plants that I have but you have them positioned in different ways with different neighbors. You are very talented. I love your design sense.

    One plant I need to move is the Thalictrum. Mine didn't bloom at all this year and I think it's because I've got them under too much shade.

    Gorgeous photos!

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  17. Julie,the lamb ears is so soft, love it! My sedum is blooming too. Your garden is lovely.

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